≡ Menu

U.S. Army To Spend Billions On Renewable Energy Office

US Navy SEALs

Secretary of the U.S. Army John McHugh has announced the Energy Initiatives Office launch, which will be used to help the Army plan and deploy renewable energy projects in their military efforts.

The goal is for the Army to generate 25 percent of its power from renewable energy sources by 2025. This will require an estimated $7.1 billion investment over the next 10 years, and the power plants purchased with the money will generate 2.1 million megawatt-hours of energy.

The objective of the Energy Initiatives Office is to help various bases and divisions qualify for discounts, as well as teach the Army how to manage power plants more efficiently.

The federal government consumes two percent of the energy used in the United States, with 90 percent of that total accounted for by the Department of Defense. Renewable investments by the military could make a considerable difference in cutting costs on overall government spending. Efforts made by the Department of Defense also have a large impact on other departments, often working as the first group to try out new ideas.

Another supporter of renewable energy sources in the military is Ray Mabus, Secretary of the Navy. He has made it known that one of the largest jobs for the Navy at the moment is protecting convoys for gas and oil into Afghanistan. Service personnel are putting their lives at risk to protect fuel lines.

In addition,  70 percent of the world’s population lives within 100 miles of an ocean coastline, and rising sea levels as a result of global warming will cause security hazards in the U.S and around the world that will have to be addressed by the Navy. Their goal is to have half of their bases running as a net-zero energy facility within the next 10 years, and they have already invested in biofuels and hybrid ships.

Sustainable resources in the military could have a huge impact on the energy costs spent by the federal government each year. With the federal deficit well into the trillions, what have they got to lose?

Via greentechmedia
Image CC licensed by Official U.S. Navy Imagery

Comments on this entry are closed.