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Woolly Mammoth Caught On Video In Siberia (Slow Clap)

Okay, so The Sun has this story about a, previously thought to be long extinct, lone woolly mammoth being caught on video while crossing a river in the Siberian wilderness. Mammoths died out thousands of year ago, by the way. The video has of course gone viral, so it’s now a mammoth viral video. Slow clap for the creator(s)?

I’m sure we’d all love to think there are still previously undetected wooly mammoths still roaming the wilderness, and there may really be newly created mammoths in about 5 years or so – if some genetic scientists have anything to do with it (see recent post Woolly Mammoths May Be Resurrected Within 5 Years for details). However, unless they are suddenly ahead of schedule, this has got hoax written all over it.

It’s certainly and intriguing and compelling piece of video. Hats off to those who created it. According to The Sun (which no doubt rings alarm bells right away for many), it is claimed the footage was captured by a government-employed engineer last summer. Who’s that then?

Apparently “its hair matches samples recovered from mammoth remains regularly dug up from the permafrost in frozen Russia.” You mean the guy who captured the video got a hair sample and had it analysed in a lab? Got any more detail on that? Apparently not.

There’s only a quote from a “pananormal writer” on the subject of mammoth sightings in Siberia. LOL. “It is highly possible that a number of species, extinct elsewhere, survive in the area.”. Of mammoths? Yeah, right.

Thankfully, the article goes on to say that viewers are divided on the validity of the video, dismissing it as a hoax, or as footage of an lost elephant (in Siberia?), or a bear with a large fish caught in its mouth.

How do you think this video was created? It looks to me like the movements of the beast are a tad unnatural, as it moves too fast through the rocky riverbed and fast flowing water. I’d say it has been digitally created rather than being a bear with a fish, or perhaps digitally manipulated from bear-with-a-fish footage. And why the hell wouldn’t you go a bit closer with the camera, and focus for that matter?

You’ve got to love a successful hoax, don’t you?

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