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Denmark Reaches 2020 Solar Energy Development Goal 8 Years Early

Solar panels in Copenhagen

The country of Denmark has now reached it’s stated 2020 solar energy development goal of 200 megawatts of capacity 8 years early.

So why has solar power grown so rapidly in Denmark? Cleantechnica reports that KIm Schultz, the project manager of Invest Denmark, has said:

“The demand for solar cells has increased dramatically since net metering was implemented in 2010. Net metering gives private households and public institutions the possibility of ‘storing’ surplus production in the public grid, which makes solar panels considerably more attractive.”

Denmark also has a enviable design tradition that’s infused in Denmark’s solar industry, so aesthetics and “thinking ahead of user needs” are an integral parts of solar product and service development. According to Schultz, this means that solutions for solar power are more likely to meet the demands of customers than in some other nations.

In addition, Denmark already generates a substantial proportion of power from renewable energy, so the existing energy system is a good platform for smart grid technologies – which are crucial for taking full advantage of solar power. Because of this already high share of renewable energy, the momentum is also there for continued development.

As we reported earlier, Denmark sees the ongoing Eurozone economic crisis as a great opportunity for transitioning to a green economy. Denmark is aiming for 50% renewable energy by 2020, and the full 100% by 2050. It’s off to a great start.

via Cleantechnica
Image CC licensed by David Gifford: Solar panels at Tivoli Gardens in Copenhagen

Comments on this entry are closed.

  • solar equipment supplier

    Its really an inspirational acievement .Every country should follow the path of development on which Demark has achieved the pinnacle of success.

  • http://www.the9billion.com/ John Johnston

    They are certainly setting a great example of what can be achieved.

  • Anonymous

    Wow! If they can make solar work when they don’t even have sun, why can’t we get this right in South Afrca!